If I Attended Marshall College // Late 1930s

There is a certain girl in the beginning of “Raiders of the Lost Ark,” walking in the background for about three seconds. Her appearance is so quick, I couldn’t get a clear screenshot. She happens to be wearing an outfit a lot like this one!

The scene is set in Connecticut, where Dr. Jones is a professor at Marshall College in 1936. I’ve always loved those few short scenes of the campus. Watching it seems to bring back memories I’ve never really had or experienced. It’s funny how that works, sometimes.

When I’d heard that “Raiders” was showing at a local theater, I knew I wanted to wear this specific outfit. It was going to be in 4DX, you know, where the seats move to the action and water sprays in your face (the submarine scene got a little out of hand). There was a button to control the water for your individual seat, which I quickly turned off. But with every other seat around you going off, getting sprinkled with cold water is mostly unavoidable. The wind of the desert, the wood smoke smell from the burning fires, and the effect of air whizzing past your head for narrowly missing bullets makes you really feel like you’re part of the story. And there’s NOTHING like the feeling of a sudden piece of rotating plastic hitting your feet while watching snakes slither around Indy’s shoes. Definitely hated that. So must have the lady in front of me since she screamed so loud. I think I saw everyone in the theater scramble to lift up their feet in horror the first time it happened.

I think 4DX movies can be truly captivating and fun, if done right. Sometimes the seat just jostles you around so much, you focus more on that than what’s happening on the screen. For me, it’s like riding a really hectic wooden rollercoaster. When it’s just tossing me everywhere, I get really mad, furious actually, that I’m being pushed around and can’t fight back. How are you supposed to punch a rollercoaster in the face? It’s not fair if there’s no way to retaliate! Does not all of the world’s population feel as I do; aggravated by these monstrous bullies, disguised as amusement in the form of massive constructions of lumber in which humans are fastened onto and tossed around at seventy miles per hour, compelling grown men to scream for their lives? No, just me, ok.

Saddle shoes and poodle socks: the most comfortable fashion duo ever to grace history. Very suitable for walking, dancing, and all-around adventuring.

Here’s a late 1930s photo of some stylish students from Lawrence College of Kansas. A short-sleeved sweater, plaid skirt, saddle shoes, and poodle socks all make an appearance. (Photo curtesy)

Both the sweater and cameo necklace once belonged to my grandmother. The sweater, I’ve heard, she had since high school, and I’m so happy I get to wear it. It makes it easy to remember her. Everyone who knew both of us knew how much we looked alike. I’m just so thankful that I can remember her by wearing the clothes she left for my sisters and me. I never truly got to say goodbye, but I know I’ll see her again soon. And until then, I’ll don her fashionable attire with an abundance of joy, and then hand it all down to the next generation. You definitely had great taste in fashion, Grandmom!

Heaven is a wonderful place and I’m glad that I can live there for eternity one day. And while yes, death is heartbreaking and depressing to us here still on Earth, I quickly remember that there is no death in Heaven, only life, beautiful and blissful life, where we know no trials, no pain. . . And no tormenting rollercoasters that make me infuriated, which I am quite pleased about.

So yes, we can mourn in our own ways. It’s healthy to feel those feelings, not wrong. We cry them out and then think of the happy truths around us that encourage us to cheer up. I think so often today, people associate crying with weakness. But being sad is a way of showing our love for people. When Lazarus died, Jesus went to his grave and cried, right in front of everybody (John 11:35), even though He knew He would bring him back to life in a few minutes. Showing that sadness, having those feelings was an example of how much He loved His friend, and that is a beautiful thing. He lets us know that we can be sad for a while, and that it’s okay. Our love for someone else is just an example of how God loves us, which I think is pretty amazing.

And lastly, to finish up this fashion post:

A photo of me being locked inside the mall bookstore because I wouldn’t leave. . .

(No, I was actually helping my sister close up shop for the night. P.S. reminder note to my sister, do not, I repeat, do not use that shady back elevator to take out the trash, alone. It was creepy enough when both of us went together.)

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Skirt // thrifted

Sweater and necklace // my grandmom’s

Belt // thrifted

Shoes // payless

Poodle socks // irish dance store

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Which Indiana Jones film is your favorite, Raiders of the Lost Ark, Temple of Doom, or The Last Crusade? (The fourth film doesn’t count in my book.)

Is there some item handed down to you that reminds you of a loved one?

Have you ever gotten mad at a rollercoaster?

A Day at the Museum // And Other Adventures

A Day at the Museum // And Other Adventures

Well, well, well. I’ve again returned from the tight clutches of reality to my special little place on the internet, and with good reason. (Yes, I am celebrating my blog’s fifth anniversary this week, but that is not the reason for my posting.) I’ve happened to experience a day of glorious adventures, and not far from home. I do believe that I went overboard with editing these photos. Some I edited to make them look vintage, others are overedited because of poor indoor lighting. I only ask you to overlook the ones less than desirable, as they show their quality. *insert Faramir meme here*

There was a special exhibit at one of my favorite museums, one that my sister and I immediately planned to see as soon as the museum announced its arrival. I knew I had to dress vintage for the trip.

There was no particular decade to this outfit, it was a more of a mish-mash. . . pardon me, a “collection” of different decades. The dress was given to me by a friend (thanks Miss Sue) and I altered it a bit to make it appear more vintage. I’d like to think that it could fit into either the 30s, or 40s. However, some of these photos remind me of ones from the 1970s. Let’s just say, I was a time traveler that day.

You may be wondering about this special exhibit, the one I was so excited to visit. Well, first take a guess. . . hint: It rhythms with Hatharine Kepburn. I’ll give you a moment to think real hard on this one.

Did you get it? Of course, you did. Katharine Hepburn is one of my favorite actresses (pictured here with Cary Grant from the 1938 film Bringing Up Baby, which also happens to be one of my favorite movies).

I was lucky enough to be in the presence of many of Katharine Hepburn’s film costumes spanning over her entire career. Two large rooms were filled with gowns, suits, shoes, accessories, and personal items that once belonged to her. I could have spent hours in front of each display, it was captivating to be so close to history, and old Hollywood. Pictured below are just some of the many costumes in the exhibit.

Here’s her famous black gown from Adam’s Rib (1949).

Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner (1967).

The Philadelphia Story (1940), Stage Door (1937), The Little Minister (1934), and then Me (2021).

The Lion in Winter (1968), and Long Day’s Journey Into Night (1962).

Mrs. Delafield Wants to Marry (1986).

Her personal everyday shoes.

The Lake (1933) Broadway Play.

These three above are from a TV show, The Corn is Green, from 1979. A lot of the costumes were from productions I’d never seen before, like this one. My list of movies and shows to watch had doubled after leaving the museum.

Oh, yeah, there was also a Lego exhibit. . .

After the museum, my sister and I had some adventures around town.

This was right around the time when a motorcycle gang showed up. They also decided to blow out two sports car engines (sounded like literal canon fire) for five minutes straight. It was strange, hence my expression and awkward stance above. The gang also asked if I had any hand sanitizer they could use, and yes, I gave them some out of my car. They now ride around town with jackets embroidered, “The Germ-Free Angels.” No they don’t, I made up that last part.

All in all, it was a wonderful day of adventures. I hope you can set aside a day to have one just as good this week. Always have a friend with you, never forget to buy some chocolate milk on the way, and always give a motorcycle gang some hand sanitizer upon request.

Dress // gifted

Shoes // thrifted

Clutch purse // thrifted

Hairclip // gifted

I Made Jo’s White Dress // Little Women 1994

I Made Jo’s White Dress // Little Women 1994

It was love at first sight. The glorious white dress worn by Winona Ryder (who, as we all know, played Jo March in the best film version of Little Women ever made) was clearly a moment of pure inspiration to my eyes. I strongly declared to myself, that one day, I would recreate it so that I might run through airy fields and wander in an ever deepening forest. And as of late, I am happily able to say that I’ve done all three of those things!

First, here are photos of the original dress, designed by Colleen Atwood:

Little Women, 1994. Costumes designed by Colleen Atwood.

If someone were to ask me how I made it, I would justifiably tell them, “I don’t really know.” I hand draped it piece by piece until it looked right, then sewed it together and voila! I didn’t use a pattern for any of the pieces (half because I couldn’t find any to use, the other half because I despise patterns). The sheer white fabric, I found on a four-foot roll at a thrift shop for $8. The under petticoat cotton was from Joann’s on sale for around $12. The blue ribbon was $4, and lastly the four buttons I used for the front closure and the cuffs, I already had. So in total, the entire dress cost was only $24 and about 10 hours of work. Some of the smaller areas, like the cuffs and front ruffles, I sewed by hand, but the rest was done by machine (except for the hem, because the sheer fabric is VERY thin and I didn’t want an ugly puckered line going around the bottom). I also purposely double hemmed it, making it too short so I wouldn’t get it dirty when I inevitably explored the countryside. If I ever want it longer, all I have to do is snip one thread and I easily gain two more inches at the bottom.

Once it was finally complete, I trekked to my favorite Civil War battlefield and lived out an entire day as Jo March. It was wonderful, until I realized the swarm of tics and crickets attached to my skirts! Nevertheless, such bothers can be quickly remedied. It was a magical day of seemingly endless joy and adventure. Sometimes it feels as though ordinary life is just the time we spend in between our last fairytale day and our next.

Carrying around my leather-bound copy of Charles Dickon’s Pickwick Papers made me feel like Jo all the more!

The dress was designed to mimic what we call a “chemise a la reine” or a “gaulle,” made popular by Marie Antoinette. So, give or take a few minor changes, this dress works for both the 18th and 19th centuries. Just change the ribbon, throw on an oversized straw hat with flowers and feathers, and you’re ready to step into another century! I’d say this style is a true classic in the category that is historical attire, with as much versatility as any other piece of clothing I can think of!

Of course, it’s not a perfect match and I don’t look much like Winona, but side by side, I’d like to say it’s a semi-good imitation of the dress! There will always be room for improvement, and my next project should be slightly better in both quality and resemblance (at least I hope).

The post would never be complete without a mandatory dress spinning shot.

Out of all the literary characters to exist in the world, I think that I connect with Jo March more than any other, even more than Anne Shirley or Lizzy Bennet, I’d say. Jo and I are both writers, we like to wear the same things, we have three other siblings, we’re both the second eldest, and we think very much alike. So, I’m glad that this dress was my first film recreation project, the first among many to come!

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Which film costume would you want to recreate most?

What film has your favorite costumes in it of all time?

Can you guess what costume project I’m working on next?!

Leave a comment!

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Megan Joy

Diana of Avonlea // Victorian Outfit

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If you remember, in “Anne of Green Gables: The Sequel” Diana Berry wears something like this; a white blouse and a creamy off-white skirt. The outfit is plain and simple, yet glorious in all its splendor! I wanted to recreate the outfit, so I gathered some of my Victorian things to piece together.

Anne of Green Gables httpanneofgreengables.com (3)

Source

Diana wears another off-white dress in the cow scene!

Source

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I however, chose not to venture out into a muddy field for a photoshoot, so this will have to do!

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Anne also wears something like this in a scene with Gilbert.

Anne of Green Gables httpanneofgreengables.com (5)

Source

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skirt // sewn by me

blouse // thrifted

shoes // thrifted

belt // sewn by me

underskirt // sewn by me

hat // thrifted

necklace // chicwish

parasol // civil war sutler

collar pin // thrifted

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Megan Joy