Poems of Old // All Nature Has a Feeling

Spring is on its way and I’m 98% sure that you are eagerly waiting for it, as I am. There’s just something outstandingly special about that season. It brings so many good feelings into my heart that I can’t exactly explain in words, which is why I decided to post this poem by John Clare, All Nature Has a Feeling. The first three lines are my favorite, as I find them so very true. It’s a short poem, nevertheless packed with little meanings and things to think about. Read away!

Poems of Old - All Nature Has a Feeling - simplymeganjoy.wordpress.com

All nature has a feeling: woods, fields, brooks

Are life eternal: and in silence they

Speak happiness beyond the reach of books;

There’s nothing mortal in them; their decay

Is the green life of change; to pass away

And come again in blooms revivified.

Its birth was heaven, eternal in its stay,

And with the sun and moon shall still abide

Beneath their day and night and heaven wide.

John Clare, 1800s

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Do you ever get those spring feelings?

What are some things you’re looking forward to in the new season?

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Megan Joy

Poems of Old // Afton Water

This poem by the Scottish writer, Robert Burns, was composed in 1791, and later put to music as Flow Gently, Sweet Afton in 1837, by Jonathan Spilman. By what I’ve been recently told, I may be in some way related to Robert Burns the poet, so I feel a special connection to the words I’ve been singing for years. I love the words Burns chose to rhythm together; it’s such a lovely piece to read.

Poems of Old - Afton Water - simplymeganjoy.wordpress.com.JPG

 

Flow gently, sweet Afton, among thy green braes,

Flow gently, I’ll sing thee a song in thy praise;

My Mary’s asleep by thy murmuring stream,

Flow gently, sweet Afton, disturb not her dream.

 

Thou stock-dove, whose echo resounds thro’ the glen,

Ye wild whistling blackbirds in yon thorny den,

Thou green-crested lapwing, thy screaming forbear,

I charge you disturb not my slumbering fair.

 

How lofty, sweet Afton, thy neighbouring hills,

Far mark’d with the courses of clear winding rills;

There daily I wander as noon rises high,

My flocks and my Mary’s sweet cot in my eye.

 

How pleasant thy banks and green valleys below,

Where wild in the woodlands the primroses blow;

There oft, as mild Ev’ning sweeps over the lea,

The sweet-scented birk shades my Mary and me.

 

Thy crystal stream, Afton, how lovely it glides,

And winds by the cot where my Mary resides,

How wanton thy waters her snowy feet lave,

As gathering sweet flowrets she stems thy clear wave.

 

Flow gently, sweet Afton, among thy green braes,

Flow gently, sweet river, the theme of my lays;

My Mary’s asleep by thy murmuring stream,

Flow gently, sweet Afton, disturb not her dream.

Robert Burns, 1791

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Do you know this as a song or a poem?

Did you ever find out that one of your ancestors is well-known?

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Megan Joy

Poems of Old // Weep You No More

Have you ever seen the 1995 version of Sense and Sensibility starring Emma Thomson and Kate Winslet? Do you remember the song that Marianne sings in the movie (the scene where Colonel Brandon sees her for the first time)? Well, this is it! It was originally a poem supposedly written by an anonymous poet in the 1800s, although there are rumors that it was written by the English musician John Dowland in 1603 to an alternate tune. Whether either be true, it is a beautiful work of poetry and I wanted to share it!

Poems of Old - Weep You No More Sad Fountians simplymeganjoy.wordpress.com.JPGWeep you no more, sad fountains;

What need you flow so fast?

Look how the snowy mountains

Heaven’s sun doth gently waste.

But my sun’s heavenly eyes

View not your weeping,

That now lie sleeping

Softly, now softly lies

Sleeping.

 

Sleep is a reconciling,

A rest that peace begets.

Doth not the sun rise smiling

When fair at even he sets?

Rest you then, rest, sad eyes,

Melt not in weeping

While she lies sleeping

Softly, now softly lies

Sleeping.

Anonymous

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Have you ever seen the 1995 version of Sense and Sensibility?

Do you remember Marianne singing this song?

To watch a clip of this scene from Sense and Sensibility, click HERE!

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Megan Joy

Poems of Old // Hope is the Thing with Feathers

This week’s poem is by the inspiring Emily Dickinson (1830-1886). It is believed to have been written during the first year of the Civil War and published three decades later. Below you can read her clever way with words in “Hope is the Thing with Feathers.”

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Hope is the things with feathers

That perches in the soul,

And sings the tune without words,

And never stops at all,

 

And sweetest in the gale is heard;

And sore must be the storm

That could abash the little bird

That kept so many warm.

 

I’ve heard it in the chillest land,

And on the strangest sea;

Yet, never, in extremity,

It asked a crumb of me.

Emily Dickinson, 1861

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What do you think of this poem?

Don’t you just love Dickinson’s pleasant phrasing?

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Megan Joy

 

 

Poems of Old // The Lady of Shallot

This is the first post of the new 2018 weekly series: Poems of Old! Each week, I’ll share a poem or excerpt dated 1950 or older. This poem, written by Alfred Lord Tennyson in 1842, is my favorite work by Tennyson, mostly for the reason that it plays a part in the Anne of Green Gables book and movie! Wanting to be like Anne, I’ve memorized the first paragraph of part two, which you can read below! I do not necessarily find the entire story of the Lady of Shallot appealing, though I like the flow and rhythm of this famous Tennyson work.Poems of Old -  The Lady of Shallot - simplymeganjoy.wordpress.com 1.JPG

Part II

(first paragraph) 

“There she weaves by night and day

A magic web with colors gay.

She has heard a whisper say,

A curse is on her if she stay

To look down to Camelot.

She knows not what the curse may be

And so she weaveth steadily,

And little other care hath she,

The Lady of Shalott.”

Afred Lord Tennyson, 1842

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Have you ever memorized a poem just for fun?

What do you think of the new series?

What’s your favorite poem written before 1950? I always need more poem to feature!

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Megan Joy